Architectural Toolkit

This toolkit steps through all common details of buildings (eaves, handrails, rafter tails, etc.) and illustrates a variety of choices from simple to refined and from reserved to romantic. With this toolkit, one could build many versions of a single floor plan (so long as the massing is simple) and they would have the rich variety commonly found in old towns. This allows for a broader use of stock plans than currently occurs in the better traditional neighborhoods.

Author: SteveMouzon

Steve Mouzon is an architect, urbanist, author, blogger, and photographer from Miami. He founded the New Urban Guild, which helped foster the Katrina Cottages movement. The Guild hosts Project:SmartDwelling, which works to redefine the house to be much smaller and more sustainable. Steve founded and is a board member of the Guild Foundation; it hosts the Original Green initiative. Steve speaks regularly across the US and abroad on sustainability issues. He blogs on the Original Green Blog and usefulstuff.posterous.com. He also posts to the Original Green Twitter stream (@stevemouzon.)

2 thoughts on “Architectural Toolkit”

  1. Good question, Sandy… thanks! And while the obvious Lean application to me was making it easier and much less expensive to get a great variety of architecture, you’ve brought up the point of calibration of the tool as well.

    Because it’s a sliding scale from the simple to the refined, you can show only part of the range, and sliding it down the range automatically makes it less expensive to build. The place I’m writing it for is going to be lower-budget, so an entire quarter of the spectrum on the high end isn’t covered at all.

    Liked by 1 person

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